K-State Research and Extension News
March 11, 2013
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Southern Plains Drought Summit Planned March 27


MEDICINE LODGE, Kan. – Recent snows and rain showers may have provided moisture to the surface of southern Plains soils, but the persistent drought conditions of the past two years will continue to affect agriculture for the foreseeable future. To aid those involved in agriculture who must make decisions about how to survive this historic drought, K-State Research & Extension will host the Southern Plains Drought Summit on Wednesday, March 27 at the Pratt Area 4-H Center on the Pratt County Fairgrounds. 

Registration for the full day conference is $10 with an RSVP due by 5 p.m. on March 22 or $20 per person after that time and at the door. The price includes refreshments, lunch and a proceedings booklet.  For more information or to RSVP, contact the Barber County Extension Office at (620) 886-3971 or tmarshal@ksu.edu.

The day begins with registration at 9:30 a.m., and the program starting at 10 a.m. Presentation topics and speakers include:

  • Crop Assessment Tools and Techniques and Options for Drought-Stressed Crops or Planting Another Crop - Jim Shroyer, K-State Research and Extension crop production extension specialist;
  • Insurance Considerations for Crop Producers and Overview of the Pasture, Rangeland and Forage Insurance Program - Rebecca Davis, director, Risk Management Agency regional office, Topeka, Kan.;
  • Crops Q & A - Jim Shroyer and Rebecca Davis;
  • Drought Management Economic Considerations - Gregg Ibendahl, associate professor, K-State Department of Agricultural Economics;
  • Use of Rumensin in Cow Herds - Katie Kueser, Elanco Animal Health Sales Representative;
  • Using Production Benchmarks to Troubleshoot Problems or Monitor Performance - John  Jaeger, associate professor, beef scientist, K-State Ag Research Center – Hays;
  • Drought Adjustments for Range and Pasture - Keith Harmoney, professor, range scientist, K-State Ag Research Center – Hays;
  • Supplementation and Mineral Considerations During Drought - Justin Waggoner, associate professor, K-State Southwest Area extension beef specialist;
  • Symptoms and Treatments: Water Quality and Poisonous Plant Issues and Herd Health and Early Weaning Considerations - Larry Hollis, K-State Extension specialist, beef production medicine; and
  • Drought Data and Climate Prediction Resources and Weather Predictions for 2013 and Beyond - Jeff Hutton, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/National Weather Service, Dodge City, Kan.

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K-State Research and Extension is a short name for the Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service, a program designed to generate and distribute useful knowledge for the well-being of Kansans. Supported by county, state, federal and private funds, the program has county Extension offices, experiment fields, area Extension offices and regional research centers statewide. Its headquarters is on the K-State campus, Manhattan.

Story by: Tim Marshall
tmarshal@ksu.edu
K-State Research & Extension News

Tim Marshall – 620-886-3971 or tmarshal@ksu.edu